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Collections Metropolis of Mytiline, Eressos and Plomari

Item ID: 240
Item Number: 29
Collection: Metropolis of Mytiline, Eressos and Plomari
Item Name: The presentation of the Virgin
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Year: 17nth century
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Dimensions: 41.5 x 39.5cm
Condition state: Very good
Current position: EPISCOPAL RESIDENCE COLLECTION


Description: The panel is a two-tier one, divided unequally. The panel is hollowed out so as to from a narrow boarder. The boarder is decorated with foliate motifs in different colors. The scene depicted on the upper panel, describes the presentation of the Virgin before the Temple. She is depicted as a young girl, in a standing position, wearing a wine-red color maphorion and a brown chiton. Her hands are raised in an attitude of prayer and forwarded towards the high priest Zechariah, who his arms are raised an embracing gesture. The priest stands in front of the entrance of the Temple clad in clerical vestments.
Behind her, stands a choir of maidens carrying lighted candles. The presents of Virgin Mary follows the little maiden choir. Depicted in larger proportions than the rest of the figures, are presented in serenity and gladness. Their hands are raised in an attitude of prayer and a gold halos decorates their heads. Two schematically rendered buildings, frame the icon in each side. Virgin Mary is seated under a canopy at the end of a stairway outlined in the right building. An angel appears through a cloud, holding a long crucifixion in his left hand while offering a loaf of bread to Virgin Mary.
The opposite side building is schematically rendered as a two-storey one, featuring the western architecture, from which a young female figure watch the ceremony.
A large band is tied from a tree, which emerges from the walls that visually links the two building. The other end of the band is tied in one of the columns which form the baldachin Virgin Mary is seated.
The icon can be dated to the 17nth century.