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Collections Metropolis of Mytiline, Eressos and Plomari

Item ID: 219
Item Number: 8
Collection: Metropolis of Mytiline, Eressos and Plomari
Item Name: The Ascension of Christ
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Year: 16nth century
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Dimensions: 44 x 30.5cm
Condition state: Very good
Current position: EPISCOPAL RESIDENCE COLLECTION


Description: Following the iconographic tradition, the compositional scheme of the particular icon is clearly undermined by the interrelated and successive topics.
In the upper part, Christ is depicted engulfed into a gold rayed mandorla, flanked by two angels represented with long wings and supporting the aureole. Christ is clad in a light brown himation enriched with light highlights. He extends his right hand in blessing and holds the scroll of the Word. His head is surrounded by an incised halo, bearing the monogram Ο ΩΝ (The One Who Is).
The whole scene is painted against a gold background. The decorative disposition of the barren mountain peaks discernibly divides the icon into two uneven parts.
In the lower part of the icon, centrally located and depicted in full length Virgin Mary is presented rendered in the classical style of Platytera. Her arms are wide open in an eloquent gesture of prayer, exuding calm and nobility. Surrounded on each of her sides, are the two Archangels presented in full standing position and inclining their heads towards left and right respectively. They are carrying open discernible scrolls in their right hands – words: «ΑΝΔΡΕΣ ΓΑΛΙΛΑΙΟΙ: ΤΙ ΣΤΗΚΑΤΕ ΕΜΒΛΕΠΟΝΤΕΣ ΕΙΣ ΤΟΝ ΟΥΡΑΝΟ» (YE MEN OF GALILEE, WHY STAND YE LOOKING INTO HEAVEN” (Act 1, 1:1), while poising their left hands to heaven with the left.
They bring a gold incise halo, which along with the Virgin’s halo constitute an isosceles triangle schematizing the vertical axis of the icon.
The twelve Apostles, in group of six, are flanking symmetrically the Virgin. Their posture and gesture prevails agitation, surprise and a certain level of drama, in confrontation of the presence of Christ into the Heavens.
The scene can be more significantly interpreted by the subtle nuance and refined embellishment of the figures, attesting hope and solemnity.